Posted tagged ‘Mark Waid’

“Suddenly, I miss ninjas.”

September 26, 2011

I’m helping kick off Christopher Higgs’ new comics criticism series at HTMLGIANT with a post about Marvel’s relaunced Daredevil title. Check it out at the link:

Shortly before the arrival of DC Comics’ New 52, DC’s competitor Marvel released the first issue of a new series starring its blind crimefighter Daredevil. In light of the timing, the new Daredevil serves as a parallel study in what makes a relaunch succeed or fail. And, if the first few issues are any indication, a master class.

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Make Mine Marvel, Malapropist: Fewer Winks, More Man-Thing – pt. 2

September 27, 2010

In which my friend (and EPA co-writer) Nathan and I continue our discussion of Marvel comics in 2010.

The Red Hulk

Greg: Interesting that you mention both the Red Hulk and the DC-ification of Marvel. I’ll reserve judgment about Red Hulk joining the Avengers till I have a sense of how [Brian Michael] Bendis writes the character. The addition of a morally ambiguous element to the team could make for a more entertaining dynamic, provided Red Hulk doesn’t suddenly start speaking in the same tone as everyone else in that book. But let’s take a step back: do we need a Red Hulk at all? Or for that matter, Skaar, son of the Hulk, or the like three She-Hulks that occasionally appear in Hulk books?

Maybe this sort of brand dilution–the move from one Hulk, to two (the first She-Hulk), to the Hulk family of today–was inevitable. If not for the Hulk, then perhaps for the more popular Wolverine, who now also has a son, Daken, and a female clone, X-23. I don’t know if you read Mark Waid‘s run on The Flash growing up, but in the ’90s, Waid got a lot of mileage (pun intended) out of surrounding the main Flash, Wally West, with a variety of other characters who had speed-based powers, such as Jay Garrick, Flash of the 1940s. This worked because for one thing, it felt like a naturally function of one Flash or another having been around, in print, for more than fifty years. The extended Flash family of Waid’s run was also relatively unique for its time. Sure, DC also had a Superboy and Supergirl to complement Superman (and I’m sure you could think of plenty more examples), but never before had a writer put together a cross-generational supporting cast, most of them variations on a core concept, quite like Waid did. (more…)